Bioassay of lithocolic acid for possible carcinogenicity. by National Cancer Institute (U.S.). Division of Cancer Cause and Prevention.

Cover of: Bioassay of lithocolic acid for possible carcinogenicity. | National Cancer Institute (U.S.). Division of Cancer Cause and Prevention.

Published by Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Cause and Prevention, Carcinogenesis Testing Program in Bethesda, Md .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Carcinogens.,
  • Bile acids -- Toxicology.

Edition Notes

Book details

SeriesCarcinogenesis technical report series ; no. 175, DHEW publication ; no. (NIH) 79-1731, DHEW publication -- no. (NIH) 79-1731.
The Physical Object
Pagination96 p. in various pagings :
Number of Pages96
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15225998M

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Full text of "Monthly catalog of United States government publications" See other formats. The -3 fatty acid cohort had had 2 deaths and no liver transplants and the historical control cohort had 7 deaths and 2 liver transplantations. 34 Parenteral lipid emulsions containing fish oil are still not approved for use in children or available in the United States and Canada.

fatty acid catabolism, resulting in a. Fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid synthesis do not occur at the same time because malonyl-CoA (an early intermediate in fatty acid synthesis) inhibits carnitine palmitoyltransferase1 and thus prevents the fatty acyl-CoA from reaching the site of -oxidation.1,25 Figure Sites of Fatty Acid Oxidation.

Metabolism During Normal Physiology5/5(1).

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